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Showing posts from December, 2018

De Quervain's like Pain After CPR

Yesterday I was demonstrating CPR in a life support workshop. Today, I have pain in the left radial styloid process area.What could it be? Searching took me to two pages of interest. One is AAFP's page on diagnosis wrist pain. This page talks about many things including Finkelstein's test which is grasping the thumb with other fingers and then ulnar deviation of wrist. It was negative for me, and I definitely did not have De Quervain's tendonitis.But it could be the same tendons. What are the tendons involved in de Quervain's? The extensor policis brevis and the abductor policis longus which both go through the groove lateral to the radial styloid process. Maybe there was some microtrauma?The other article was about wrist injuries in emergency service providers. It does not look like I have a scapholunate ligament injury. So I decided to read more about de Quervain's.I found an article - Walsh and Miller: Pain about the Styloid Process - which beautifully captures …

A Letter to the Disillusioned Intern (or Medical Student)

Disillusionment. It happens to the best among us. It has happened to you? Welcome to the club.

After all, who wouldn't be disappointed? You could have become anyone - an architect, an engineer, a teacher, a scientist, a mathematician. Yet you chose to become a doctor. Of course it was your calculated choice. What a fantastic profession is it, after all? When a doctor talks to a patient, she is a teacher, an artist; when a doctor is diagnosing an illness, she is a detective, a scientist; when a doctor is communicating, she is a writer; when managing an emergency, she is a leader; in her career, she becomes an administrator, a guide, a policy analyst, a visionary. A doctor's profession is an incredible melting point of careers. Unique, interesting. And above all, serves humankind like nobody else.

And what did it all come to? Running around like a dog completing errands passed down to you in the strictest hierarchy ever. (It is called dog work, did you know?) Maybe learning a bi…